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20131202
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
business globally. when it does come to foreign policy, many of the public top goals are driven by domestic concerns. you can take that top concern and drill down a bit further. 50% of americans say the use of military drones make the u.s. safer from terrorism compared to only 31% who say the war in afghanistan has. surprise that most americans want the country to be the only military superpower. and more seat time -- see china as number one in economic straight -- in economic strength. while we are in asia, look at something else. more young americans think that region has greater importance for the europe -- for the u.s. than europe does, but not so for older americans. but in terms of america to other countries, this has not changed much overall. the pew research study chose 12 countries and ranked them in of who viewed america favorably. even if the u.s. is wanted to mind its own business on many issues, that is not a rally cry for isolationism. 77% say it is a good thing for the u.s. to have more involvement in the global economy. >> for more on the fascinating findings come i spoke a
in foreign policy, you highlight the threat from home grown terror, from self-radicalized extremists. you suggest that the government should, one, intervene in areas between radical beliefs and violent behaviours. it should instill trust in communities where alienation is likely and integrate a whole of government approach that embodies u.s. values, can you give us the short version. >> possessing radical beliefs is protected by our constitution. that is what freedom. speech and association is about. the first amendment to our constitution. it's a core value of the united states, one which many aspire to have and observe. that's all fine. what is not fine is when possessing radical beliefs inspires the person with those beliefs, or someone he or she talks to to engage in violence behaviour. that is not protected by the constitution. the difficult challenge for government is to know when to intervene to prevent somebody from harming the rest of us, just because that person has radical beliefs. that intervention area is hard to identify. the danger is that you end up suppressing people's fr
particularly with of democrats. normally democrats who would give the president more foreign policy as sensitive as the diplomacy with iran has been. power to veto legislation. to the pentagon policy bill, that's going to be problem mattic. so, you know, the veto is out there, but if it's not a stand alone sanctions bill, they're a lot of work to do to convince congress and most importantly democrats not to join. thanks for getting up this and watching us on the washington journal. >> thank you for taking my call. i get my news is rt or press tv.com. i'm an independent now. i used to be a die hard republican. but my priority has changed how the country changed to foreign policy. i thought obama -- even though i voted for the party at ron paul to ron republicans did paul at the convention was disgusting. the party because -- took over the republican party. that's a jewish movement. controls the foreign policy. is led by the nose by netanyahu and they were horrible. who's the biggest influence the white house outside of the political realm. >> strong opposition to iran at iran deal.o
relations committee for 30 or 35 years, in the senate foreign policy was his biggest issue. he knows these subjects. he's have been experienced in them. he would be a good emissary. >> i think so. people tend to underestimate him this way. he does have the foreign policy experience. he's also very much a kind of one-on-one politician. what he's going over there to do is to defuse what is a toxic situation, and he's kind of the crisis manager. we've seen him perform this role -- >> i wouldn't say this in a way that's disrespectful. this should be handled at a lower pay grade. you may need the vice president to go talk to the chinese but to integrate a response from south korea and japan with the united states, that should be something that happens on the phone every day with lower level officials and it doesn't happen. >> it doesn't, and clearly this environment right now is very, very difficult. >> here's what he's trying to do. he's trying to send a powerful signal, the obama administration, to china and north korea. if you send a lower level person out there, that signal is going t
a diplomatic one. or as it was described to me at the time, we want to demilitarize our foreign policy, and you had a very forward-leaning point of view as it was perceived whereas hagel was seen as of a different view. first of all, is this assessment at all accurate? and second, what's happened in the ensuing months in terms of where they have gone on policies from iran to afghanistan as we were just discussing, does that, in fact, reflect this far more diplomatic and less military aapproach? >> i, i don't have a window into the president's decision making, but i, your explanation does not ring true to me, to my ears. i think chuck hagel has been close associate of president obama's since their time in the senate. of he served on the president's intelligence advisory board. i think there was a lot of discussion in the first term about finding a place for chuck hagel in the president's cabinet, and i think that that, you know, that discussion was naturally renewed when there was an opportunity to bring new people into the cabinet in the second term. so i think that is the president's, you know
you think, share your thoughts on obama foreign policy with other fox news sundayviewers on twitter at sundayviewers on twitter at #fns. this is the quicksilver cash back card from capil one. it's not the "limit the cash i earnvery month" card. it's not the "i only earn decent rewards at the gas station" card. it's the no-games, no-signing up, everyday-rewarding, kung-fu-fighting, silver-lightning-in-a-bottle, bringing-home-the-bacon cash back card. this is the quicksilver card from capital one. unlimited 1.5% cash back on eve purchase, everywhere, every single day. so ask yourself, what's in your wallet? >>> critics in this country and the middle east continue to question the nuclear deal the u.s. and its allies worked out with iran. and there is increasing concern about the new air defense zone that china has declared over disputed territory in the east china sea. joining me now to discuss this and more, former cia and nsa director michael hayden, and, general, welcome back to "fox news sunday." >> good morning, chris. >> do you look at the new six-month deal with iran as a rea
tensions over china's controversial new air defense so after months of intense u s foreign policy efforts in the middle east and budget flights at home. the us is now trying to re establish connections in the region but in a ride today in tokyo where you will seek to push forth in agreement with japan on the twelve nation mauled by a trillion dollar trans pacific partnership trade deal. better known as the ttp his trip comes less than a month before on ministerial meeting between the related countries where they will negotiate to conclude the tee pee pee by the end of this year. but biden's trade agenda has been overshadowed by a heightened tensions in the region. after china declared a new arizona. it overlaps with one already said the budget and tells the covers islands controlled by a tokyo. china has become more assertive in the east china sea. under present she didn't came. and this is putting the stages two economic giants china and japan in direct military competition. weary of a rising china. biden will address the issue and seek clarity regarding china's intentions when he meets
director of center for foreign policy at the sun is too cute. thank you for joining us they do well professor were there any clues that north korea's number two and head of the state's most powerful party would be to post. i carried you in an open and do you live in but not on though it appears though indonesian men. i would say that there's not many of you that to be the pride but. the if the blow out so often that to give us some examples of some of her naps. me i'm a bit and development should be viewed in the up and get out of the kingdom ended up with incredible if they get taller as a leader. we have to admit i now know that north korea is that the inability to agree that if the up to them i think that the home of a few credits to spend it on good thing too. so the ride it was only possible because of its kind of him. i'm not in a cute family. and because of that you feel the love of keith wife the death of him going and then i'm going to yishun was not at the canon it and bear in mind that in korean history than in any benefit that the common man cannot wait to go with it pet
in recent years. 51% say the president is not tough enough in his approach to foreign policy. ! you how one organization is playing this story on the pew study. you can get the details on the al jazeera met -- on the al jazeera website. then there is this based on your survey, 70% of those surveyed said the u.s. command less respect than it did in the past, matching little scene toward the end of president george w. bush's second term. that was something that was also surprising to us because we also conduct our global attitude studies all over the world. the image of the united states is negative all end ofe world by the george w. bush presidency, then at that .70% of americans say the u.s. was less respected around the world than it has been in the past. when barack obama came into office, we know that around the world u.s. relations improved. about 56% say this was the case in 2009 and in 2012. today it is back to 70%. likely --s are more in the credits have not changed it is not just partisanship driving. but there was a partisanship story there. host: what do we gather from all of that
work on northern ireland. she was a foreign-policy adviser to the ted kennedy and i think mayor bloomberg on the right? an interesting combination. and she's written a couple of books, good books, and she is now working on the president's declassification efforts. so she knows a lot about those documents. so, welcome, nancy. great to be working with you again. [applause] >> we have an exciting panel for you, to give you first hand a chance to hear from those authors of the many documents that you have had out here. we are going to have a brief discussion from that of an albright -- madeleine albright. i won't take your time and introducing of them again. we will have a little discussion with them and then take a few questions from the audience and then wrap it up abou around 3:0t which point we will have a short break and then the president will come so let me invite the panel to come up. [applause] >> is this on? first we want to thank the clinton library and obviously stephanie streett. the peace process is something that we are all proud of. it one of his many lasting legacie
't think it was well conceptualized and i don't think it has furthered chinese foreign policy or national security. >> woodruff: so what you have seen happen, campbell, is u.s. japan, south korea, continues military fights over that airspace, that airspace, was this -- what are the chance this is becomes a diplomatic standoff and escalates from that to a military standoff involving any of those players? >> what has gone on between japan and china has now gone on for over a year and this is like a case of the mumps, you know, it comes and goes. these territorial issues are nothing new in asia, but this particular cycle has been longer and more intense. i think the most likely thing is not a diplomatic crisis which then turns into a military crisis, but a lone actor, a guy on a fishing boat or a plane captain that basically exceeds what, you know, hopefully are occurrence rules of engagements and there is a collision or a crash or a local crisis which then has an intense short duration but in that particular area which will really cause a crisis in relations between china and japan. >> wood
to our foreign policy series discussion on the recently signed interim agreement between iran and the p5 plus germany and geneva. we have gathered a distinguished panel of experts who will walk us through what just happened and what may lie ahead. headlines during the last 48 hours have run the entire spectrum from victory for iran obamastoric mistake to achieves historic measure. most comments have followed what has become a redeemable republican/democrat divide, but recent polls indicate that nearly 2/3 of all americans support an agreement with iran at would lift sanctions for iran in return for tehran restricting its nuclear program. what is undeniable is that there are many layers to this cake, and we look forward to hearing from our panelists as they discuss whether the agreement brings new hope for nuclear negotiations with iran or further disappointment. our panelists are no strangers to the world affairs council audiences. we welcome back all three. ambassador john bloomberg is professor at the united -- professor of international affairs at the united states naval academy -- am
critic much russia's policy towards ukraine. but sergei lavrov, the russian foreign minister is here, and yesterday he condemned what he called n.a.t.o. inference into the domestic matters of the you grain. meanwhile, as you can see behind me the protest in independent square continues. there's a question, a doubt about momentum. people can carry on turning out in their thousands as they have been doing. ultimately they need a clear idea of their objectives, what they are trying to achieve and how they can achieve it. i'm not sure that they have that. that's why the ukrainian government policy may be to sit this thing out. >> barnaby phillips reports from kiev. a shift from protests on the streets of thailand. they paused demonstrations out of respect for the kings birthday. >> this was a day to fill the streets and put politics aside. tens of thousands of thais came out to see their beloved king. >> translation: i'm happy to celebrate his birthday. it makes me happy to see him. i wish he would be with us forever. >> as each year passes concern grows about the 8 six-year-old. he made
of all for the bank of england, -- not least of all for the bank of england, monetary policy. he might have something about the foreign ownership, a banner issue in london. you being tax on the sale of your ownership if you're a foreign owner. something to do with -- this is the politics of politics. going up against the opposition chancellor saying plan a worked. didn't really work or have things gotten better? they have, thankfully. there will be politics in the houses of parliament, the house of westminster behind me. for married couples. there could be a sting in the tail from foreign owners. 11:15 london time. one day late. much, ourou so markets and are manus cranny. we will bring you chancellor osborne's autumn statement at 11:15 london time. followed by the bank of england rate decision at noon london time, you can watch both here on bloomberg. american brands opening their doors and london. the latest is how where company westbound -- homeware come in the west elm. caroline hyde went to met the ceo. u.k. the talk of the economy turning around. >> yes, we had j.crew coming as w
had because manufacturing came out with best numbers since 2011. foreign investment is up construction is up. you have a lot of things i don't think the fed policy actually helps today. . i don't think necessarily it's helping employment. >> very quickly because i'm out of time. i have to ask you a specific issue pertaining to jobs and wages. there is a movement now, for example, mcdonald's workers expected to go on strike on thursday for higher wage maybe $15. walmart is holding food drives for their own employees right now. is it possible that some corporations should be forced to pay a living wage for their employees right now? is that an answer to finding better jobs for the middle class? >> no question we have to get to the right minimum wage in this country. what that number is, i'm not going to be the one to dictate or debate that number. but it's clear to me that today's number's not working. >> how much? i mean, you don't want to put a number -- assign a number to it but you agree higher -- >> i think a higher minimum wage is called for. >>
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)